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Gates talks surpassing 500 OEM partners, belt drives for the masses and trade opportunity as …

Gates talks going beyond 500 OEM partners, belt drives for the masses and trade opportunity as …

Belt-driven bikes are “not an oddity” and are quickly picking up rate in global sales, representing a substantial opportunity for urban bicycle dealers as the world’s huge cities move toward a future of active travel, believes Gates Director of Bicycle Market Todd Sellden. Having now exceeded 500 OEM partners; varying the likes of …

See all stories on this topic Finally, bike tires that can never ever, ever go flat Among the most annoying parts of biking for exercise or enjoyment (or both, if you’& rsquo; re lucky )is that bike tires appear to go flat on a weekly basis. Grabbing the pump isn’& rsquo; t exactly completion of the world, but on days when you simply want to hop on the seat and go, it’& rsquo; s a pain. Bridgestone concurs, which is why they developed an air-free …

See all stories on this topic Study: Cycling to work might reduce risk for disease, death THURSDAY, April 20, 2017– Including a couple of miles of cycling each day to your commute may add years to your life span, brand-new research recommends. The British research study discovered that cycling to work appeared to cut in half people’s chances for major disease and sudden death. Researchers from the University of Glasgow in Scotland looked at the commuting habits of more than 264,000 individuals in the UK and tracked their health over five years. Cycling to work was connected with a 46 percent lower threat of cardiovascular disease over 5 years and a 45 percent lower threat of cancer compared to an inactive commute. Risk of sudden death was 41 percent lower. Strolling to work was also advantageous, but not to the same degree. Hoofing it was associated with a 27 percent lower risk of heart problem and a 36 percent lower threat of dying from heart problem. However, it wasn’t related to a lower threat of cancer or sudden death, the study discovered. The research study does not develop a direct cause-and-effect relationship in between commuting by bike and longevity. Still, “if these associations are causal, these findings recommend that policies created to make it much easier for individuals to commute by bike … might present significant chances for public health improvement,” said researcher Dr. Jason Gill in a university press release. He’s with the Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences. Gill suggested bike lanes, city bike-sharing, subsidized bicycle purchases and increased lodging of bicycles on public transit. The scientists said cycle travelling might use higher health advantages than strolling since cyclists cover longer ranges, get more intense exercise, and have greater levels of fitness than walkers. For example, bicyclists commuted approximately 30 miles a week, compared to 6 miles a week for walkers. The research study was published April 20 in the journal BMJ. The League of American Bicyclists has more on cycle commuting. Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

See all stories on this subject Want a Longer Life? Attempt Cycling to Work

THURSDAY, April 20, 2017 (HealthDay News)– Adding a couple of miles of cycling each day to your commute may include years to your life span, new research recommends. The British study found that cycling to work appeared to cut in half people’s odds for severe illness and premature death. Scientists from the University of Glasgow in Scotland took a look at the travelling habits of more than 264,000 individuals in the United Kingdom and tracked their health over five years. Biking to work was associated with a 46 percent lower danger of cardiovascular disease over 5 years and a 45 percent lower risk of cancer compared to an inactive commute. Danger of sudden death was 41 percent lower. Walking to work was likewise advantageous, however not to the exact same degree. Hoofing it was connected with a 27 percent lower threat of cardiovascular disease and a 36 percent lower danger of dying from cardiovascular disease. However, it wasn’t related to a lower threat of cancer or premature death, the research study discovered. The study doesn’t establish a direct cause-and-effect relationship in between commuting by bike and longevity. Still, “if these associations are causal, these findings suggest that policies created to make it easier for people to commute by bike … might provide significant chances for public health improvement,” said researcher Dr. Jason Gill in a university news release. He’s with the Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences. Gill recommended bike lanes, city bike-sharing, subsidized bike purchases and increased accommodation of bikes on public transit. The researchers said cycle travelling might offer greater health advantages than walking because bicyclists cover longer ranges, get more intense exercise, and have greater levels of physical fitness than walkers. For instance, bicyclists travelled approximately 30 miles a week, compared to 6 miles a week for walkers. The study was published April 20 in the journal BMJ. More info The League of American Bicyclists has more on cycle travelling.
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